Part Time Jobs – Task BA http://taskba.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:58:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://taskba.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2-150x150.png Part Time Jobs – Task BA http://taskba.com/ 32 32 More than 400 jobs available at local job fair – NEA Report https://taskba.com/more-than-400-jobs-available-at-local-job-fair-nea-report/ Tue, 17 May 2022 18:26:52 +0000 https://taskba.com/more-than-400-jobs-available-at-local-job-fair-nea-report/ Several local economic development partners will jointly host a regional job fair at Black River Technical College in Pocahontas on May 19 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. NEA Intermodal, the Randolph County Chamber of Commerce and the Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce will jointly host the event, which will give job seekers access to […]]]>

Several local economic development partners will jointly host a regional job fair at Black River Technical College in Pocahontas on May 19 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. NEA Intermodal, the Randolph County Chamber of Commerce and the Lawrence County Chamber of Commerce will jointly host the event, which will give job seekers access to more than 300 available positions in Northeast Arkansas.

Both entry-level and skilled positions will be available for job seekers in fields such as healthcare, electrical, manufacturing, education and law enforcement. Several second chance employers will also be present.

In addition to local employers, the Arkansas Department of Workforce Mobile Center will be available to assist job seekers with resume preparation, qualification testing and other services. Representatives from Black River Technical College will also be available to help job seekers register for courses.

Participation in job fairs for employers and job seekers is FREE. The regional job fair is a valuable resource as it brings together a greater number of available positions and allows applicants to conveniently learn about companies, job openings and available benefits packages.

This job fair will offer full-time, part-time and seasonal positions. The job fair will be held from 9am to 2pm at the Randolph County Development Center on the BRTC campus.

“NEA Intermodal, together with our regional chamber partners, focuses on identification

economic development opportunities and marketing the area to potential employers and talent,” said NEA Intermodal Executive Director Graycen Bigger. “This is an important opportunity to empower our local employers and provide a vital service as we work together to recover from the pandemic and build our workforce pipeline.”

Employers interested in participating should contact their local chamber to register. A digital form is also available on the NEA Intermodal Facebook page.

Job seekers should come to the job fair prepared with copies of their CV, certificates and ID cards. Contact Graycen@neaintermodal.com with additional questions

PARTICIPATING EMPLOYERS INCLUDE:

Lawrence Health, Bosch, 1st Choice Home Care, Onin Staffing, Productive Staffing, AID Temporary Solutions, Staffmark, Inc., NEA Education Cooperative, Safelink, Jonesboro Police Department, 1st Choice Healthcare, Unilever, Unity Health Center, Arkansas Department of Workforce Services , Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, Black River Area Development Corporation

AVAILABLE JOB OPPORTUNITIES ARE:

HEALTH CARE – CNA, PCA, LPN, RN, LCSW, LPC, APRN, MD, Housekeeping, Food Technicians, Medical Laboratory Technicians, Radiology Technologists, CNA Training Program, CNA, PCA, LPN, RN, Patient Representative, Nurse, Administrative Assistant, Floor Tech, Physical Therapist, Supervisor/ Coach

MANUFACTURING – Production Manager, Assembly, Packing, Driving, Paint Prep, Housekeeping, Order Picker, Embroidery, Operator, Welder, IT Support/Helpdesk, Energy Assembly, Report Specialist, Accounts Payable, Customer Service, Supervisor/Trainer

LAW ENFORCEMENT – Security Officer, Police Officer

EDUCATION – Receptionist, Family Lawyer, Housing Manager, Housing Manager, Early Headstart, Teachers, Paraprofessionals, Floaters, Substitutes

AVAILABLE SERVICES INCLUDE:

Resume building, testing, job placement, cell phones for low income job seekers. Additional services for people with disabilities seeking employment or training.

For transportation assistance, please contact Black River Area Development Corporation.

The charge for city routes is USD 2.00 per way. BRAD gives a half price discount of $1.00

For the Pocahontas City Route, you must call (870) 892-4547. You will receive a recording. When the recording starts, just dial zero (0) and you will get our receptionist. Tell her your name, address and where you want to go.

For Walnut Ridge/Hoxie City Routes (870) 886-5461. When the receptionist replies, give her your name, address and destination.

For Corning City routes, call 1-888-7234640.

Press Release – NEA Intermodal

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Palisade to restore city fire department supervision | Western Colorado https://taskba.com/palisade-to-restore-city-fire-department-supervision-western-colorado/ Mon, 16 May 2022 02:30:51 +0000 https://taskba.com/palisade-to-restore-city-fire-department-supervision-western-colorado/ country United States of AmericaUS Virgin IslandsMinor Outlying Islands of the United StatesCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth of theCuba, RepublicDominican RepublicHaiti, RepublicJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist RepublicAlgeria, People’s Democratic RepublicAmerican SamoaAndorra, PrincipalityAngola, RepublicanguillaAntarctica (the area south of 60° S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, RepublicAzerbaijan, RepublicBahrain, KingdomBangladesh, People’s RepublicBarbadosBelarusBelgium, Kingdom ofBelizeBenin, People’s RepublicBermudasBhutan, KingdomBolivia, RepublicBosnia and […]]]>

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Central Florida health systems are rethinking nursing in the face of shortages – Orlando Sentinel https://taskba.com/central-florida-health-systems-are-rethinking-nursing-in-the-face-of-shortages-orlando-sentinel/ Sat, 14 May 2022 10:04:49 +0000 https://taskba.com/central-florida-health-systems-are-rethinking-nursing-in-the-face-of-shortages-orlando-sentinel/ Natalie M. Powell, a Miramar Licensed Resident Nurse, quit her job eight months ago to join a healthcare staffing agency and has never looked back. For years she worked in rehabilitation and group homes in the 60-hour week. As her peers burned out during the pandemic, went to recruitment agencies, or quit the job altogether, […]]]>

Natalie M. Powell, a Miramar Licensed Resident Nurse, quit her job eight months ago to join a healthcare staffing agency and has never looked back.

For years she worked in rehabilitation and group homes in the 60-hour week. As her peers burned out during the pandemic, went to recruitment agencies, or quit the job altogether, she has tried to fill the gap by working more than 80 hours a week. She considered giving up the job altogether.

“[You’re] stressed. Tired all the time, no matter how much sleep you would get, especially since you’re putting in all those hours,” she said. “It’s all about the patient. It’s no longer about your family or your children – you care about other people who are in need. … It gets arrogant.”

Now she travels across South and Central Florida filling temporary positions at health care facilities that nurses from StaffHealth.com, her agency, are requesting. She makes $6 more an hour, gets paid the same day she works, and makes her own schedule. She often chooses to be with her children during the weekdays and work on the weekends, she said.

It is estimated that one in five healthcare workers has quit their job during the pandemic, according to data intelligence firm Morning Consult. The Florida Hospital Association in October 2021, using pre-pandemic data, projected a shortage of 59,100 nurses in Florida by 2035. That number could be even larger now.

Healthcare facilities across the Orlando area are testing new methods and technologies to fill the gaps.

AdventHealth has 266 nursing positions throughout Central Florida, including part-time and traveling nursing positions, according to its website. Orlando Health has over 600 open positions for nurses in the Orlando area, according to its website. HCA Florida Healthcare has a smaller footprint in the area and has 27 open positions, its website showed.

The Florida Hospital Association’s October analysis pointed to nursing education as a key area that needs improvement: Many of Florida’s top nursing schools are turning away qualified applicants because they have insufficient places, a problem attributed to scarce nursing faculties and lack of funds is extension.

HCA Florida Healthcare, AdventHealth Central Florida, and Orlando Health offer tuition reimbursement, signing bonuses, and career opportunities to attract nurses from the limited graduate pool. The hospital systems have expanded partnerships with nursing schools and added more clinical sites.

However, adding new nurses is only part of the solution, said Teri Moore, Orlando Health’s chief intensive care unit nurse operations manager Dr. P. Phillips Hospital in Southwest Orange County.

“We have new nurses coming in and we’re hiring like crazy,” Moore said. “But these nurses don’t have the necessary experience because a lot of that experience has retired, gone or burned out. So experience is definitely something we are focusing on and trying to find ways to really keep experienced nurses at the bedside.”

Matthew Mawby, the co-founder of StaffHealth.com, said his business tripled during the pandemic. StaffHealth.com surveyed about 300 of its nurses and asked why they switched to an agency: 82% pointed to low pay and 84% said their job responsibilities had increased, Mawby said.

Marissa Lee, vice president of the National Nurses United Union and registered nurse at HCA Florida Osceola Hospital, acknowledges that hospitals are to blame for their nursing staff shortages.

Citing federal data from 2017 that suggests Florida will indeed have a surplus of 53,700 nurses by 2030, Lee and her union argue there are enough nurses to care for patients, but hospitals are evicting them, by asking them to work in “unsafe” areas. Conditions in which each nurse tends to more patients than she can handle, in addition to other duties.

Burnout and anxiety are the problem, not a shortage, she said.

“They expect the nurses not only to do their nursing duties, but also to involve the housekeeper, the nutritionist and the secretary,” Lee said. “A lot of nurses left during the pandemic because they knew, ‘I can take a travel assignment. I can be in one place for 13 weeks. If I don’t like this place, I’ll move on.’”

Conservation may require creative thinking and a more radical change in the care status quo. Among other things, Lee advocates retention bonuses and mandatory minimum staffing ratios between nurses and patients.

HCA has made recruitment and retention top priorities, said Peter Lindquist, Division Chief Nursing Executive at HCA Healthcare North Florida Division.

“Unions have their own agendas; I can only talk to us,” he said. “We care about our nurses and we take steps to show them what we do to support them in and out of the workplace. … We will continue to drive a culture that prioritizes the protection of our patients and our staff, regardless of the challenges the industry faces.”

Along with AdventHealth and Orlando Health, HCA has provided mental health resources and is hiring LPNs and patient care technicians, as well as staff in other specialties, so nurses don’t have to take on responsibilities that could be done by someone else. Lindquist added that frontline employees help HCA make decisions and this has led to changes in staffing models and technology. The system recently invested $50 million in its nurses, he said.

Orlando Health and AdventHealth have turned to virtual nursing. Experienced, licensed nurses can talk to staff or patients through screens and complete any tasks that can be done remotely.

This could attract nurses back into the profession who are physically unable to work in person, said Linnette Johnson, AdventHealth’s Central Florida Division-South chief nursing officer.

“There are nurses out there, they are retired. And in a nutshell, they’re saying, “We don’t want to work 12-hour days, that’s some long days on our feet.” But boy would they love a virtual nurse position,” she said. “What I love about this rapid brainstorming, whether it’s technology or unconventional thinking, is that I think it broadens the horizons for caregivers.”

AdventHealth is testing the service at its DeLand campus, where employees say it has given them more time to complete tasks that can only be done in person and improved patient safety.

The hospital hasn’t tumbled patients in about two months because virtual nurses can call the nurses if they see at-risk patients trying to get out of their beds, Jun Baniqued, a registered nurse at AdventHealth DeLand, said Thursday.

“I think that’s the evolution of what the future of nursing is,” Baniqued said. “Bedside nursing isn’t going away, but it’s being enhanced by technology — virtual nursing, robotics, everything. Those are the things we should look forward to.”

The health report

Weekly

A weekly update on health news in Florida.

Now that COVID-19 is no longer pushing hospitals to their limits, nurses who have traveled are returning. Moore said about 10% of employees who left Orlando Health are returning.

Another component of many healthcare systems’ retention strategies is an attempt to create a community that employees will not want to leave.

Lindquist pointed to HCA Healthcare’s charity events. For example, in December, nurses got together to host a Christmas party for foster children.

Lindquist said nurses told him, “That’s why I became a nurse, and that more than anything has helped me recover as a nurse, restore my well-being.”

Jeffrey Wells, assistant nurse manager at AdventHealth DeLand, said he was there as a traveling nurse nearly five years ago and decided to stay on full-time.

“It’s good to move or something, but after a while you want to find a core group of people to work with,” Wells said. “Here on this floor we are like a family.”

ccatherman@orlandosentinel.com; @CECatherman on twitter

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Fellows of the Black Theater Coalition and Broadway Across America Celebrate Inaugural Season | Broadway buzz https://taskba.com/fellows-of-the-black-theater-coalition-and-broadway-across-america-celebrate-inaugural-season-broadway-buzz/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:23:30 +0000 https://taskba.com/fellows-of-the-black-theater-coalition-and-broadway-across-america-celebrate-inaugural-season-broadway-buzz/ Producer Warren Adams addresses the JGO Fellows at a reception. (Photos by Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com) The inaugural cohort of Fellows for the previously announced Black Theater Coalition/Broadway Across America Fellowship, sponsored by the John Gore Organization, celebrated the Fellowship’s conclusion with a trip to New York City. The grant program began in January and […]]]>

Producer Warren Adams addresses the JGO Fellows at a reception.
(Photos by Emilio Madrid for Broadway.com)

The inaugural cohort of Fellows for the previously announced Black Theater Coalition/Broadway Across America Fellowship, sponsored by the John Gore Organization, celebrated the Fellowship’s conclusion with a trip to New York City. The grant program began in January and resulted in Jessica Augustave, Cris Blak, Allison Currie, Je’Shaun Jackson, Rickey Orr and Viraj Shriwardhankar receiving paid part-time positions in commercial theater administration.

During their trip, the grantees attended events including a Black Industry Professional Panel with Brian Moreland, Irene Gandy, Aaliytha Stevens and Alia Jones-Harvey and met with leading industry experts including Barbara Whitman, Kumiko Yoshii, Brian Moreland, Nick Scandalios , Tom Schumacher, Jack Eldon and Meredith Blair/Brian Brooks. The group also had a mix with the Black Theater Coalition and their Fellowship cohort, including Warren Adams, T. Oliver Reid, Charlotte St. Martin, David Stone and BTC’s Board of Trustees.

“My co-founders Warren Adams, Reggie Van Lee and I are truly excited about what this partnership with Broadway Across America/John Gore Organization has offered this first cohort of young black professionals by placing them in regional BAA offices,” said T. Oliver Reid, BTC co-founder and artistic director, in a statement, “What started this year with six grantees, we look forward to doubling in more offices next year. Lauren Reid and the BAA team stepped feet first into this partnership and inspired us with their compassion and drive to make this program a reality. We look forward to an enduring partnership with BAA/JGO as we continue to break the illusion of inclusion in American Theater.”

The BTC/BAA Scholarship is pleased to announce that the next class of scholars will be welcomed to BAA in January 2023. Applications for the upcoming spring cycle are now available.

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The department struggles to fill seasonal positions https://taskba.com/the-department-struggles-to-fill-seasonal-positions/ Tue, 10 May 2022 11:01:08 +0000 https://taskba.com/the-department-struggles-to-fill-seasonal-positions/ Michigan is again having trouble finding summer staff for its state parks. So far, the state has hired 636 short-time workers from 1,300 vacant seasonal jobs, with another 123 to be hired pending drug tests. Workers in state parks have to wear a lot of hats, said Ron Olson, the state director for parks and […]]]>

Michigan is again having trouble finding summer staff for its state parks.

So far, the state has hired 636 short-time workers from 1,300 vacant seasonal jobs, with another 123 to be hired pending drug tests.

Workers in state parks have to wear a lot of hats, said Ron Olson, the state director for parks and recreation at the Department of Natural Resources. They work in parks, state campgrounds and marinas, answering visitors’ questions, maintaining trails, cleaning buildings and more.

Last summer, the department was only able to hire 736 people in the face of the same problem. Olson expects a similar number this time.

More:Moose, sturgeon and osprey – oh my! How Michigan saved wildlife from extinction

State parks rely on seasonal summer employees because staffing needs during the warmer months would be impossible to keep on the books as recreational opportunities dwindle in the winter.

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A real Mother’s Day gift? Flexible jobs and flexible benefits | blogs https://taskba.com/a-real-mothers-day-gift-flexible-jobs-and-flexible-benefits-blogs/ Sun, 08 May 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/a-real-mothers-day-gift-flexible-jobs-and-flexible-benefits-blogs/ This Mother’s Day is my first as a new mom. Now I join the chorus of women who have long voiced the challenges of balancing motherhood and work. This challenge increased significantly during the pandemic as women stepped back from their careers due to fewer childcare options. It lingers in a post-pandemic world where the […]]]>

This Mother’s Day is my first as a new mom. Now I join the chorus of women who have long voiced the challenges of balancing motherhood and work. This challenge increased significantly during the pandemic as women stepped back from their careers due to fewer childcare options. It lingers in a post-pandemic world where the female labor force participation rate lags behind that of men and is a full percentage point below pre-pandemic levels.

Some consider parental allowance to be the ultimate solution. But every mom knows that the challenge doesn’t suddenly end when maternity leave ends.

The other consideration is access to affordable childcare options, but even that doesn’t complete the planning puzzle. For many mothers, for example, childcare times are not compatible with their working hours. This is where flexible working arrangements can be transformative. Allowing a mother labor autonomy over when and where she works improves her chances of participating in the labor force and pursuing employment opportunities that would otherwise have been unattainable.

Indeed, several decades of economics research show that women tend to be more flexible about job choices themselves, in large part because they need to plan their work hours around childcare activities.

The expansion of temporary, part-time and casual jobs also helped more women enter the labor market in the 1980s and 1990s.

More recently, the pandemic has changed the way we think about work.

And while we’ve seen some progress in adopting permanent work-from-home policies in certain industries, ultimately it may have been a short-lived revolution. Many workers have now been called back into the office and no real progress has been made in the transition from the strict 9-to-5 workday.

It’s no surprise that women are turning back to independent work – often referred to as “self-employment” or “gig economy” jobs – precisely because flexibility is their key feature. A mom running a shop on Etsy can work from home and has more freedom to choose when and how often to work.

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This is consistent with recent data showing an influx of women as independent contractors. While it’s still more prevalent among men, two separate studies using official tax data show that women’s labor force participation rates have risen much faster since 2001 – even at a time when overall female employment was relatively flat. In one of these studies, the authors suggested that the long-term growth in the independent workforce “is not solely due to individuals seeking additional income or the rise of a few online platforms, but may represent a structural change in the labor market, especially for women.”

Women also make up a larger proportion of self-employed people in sectors other than transport, such as on e-commerce platforms or childcare and tutoring platforms, or among professional freelancers in occupations such as translators, nutritionists and proofreaders.

Pre-pandemic survey results show that flexibility was indeed the main motivation for women to enter the independent workforce.

Even after the pandemic, flexibility remains a key issue. A survey conducted by the Brookings Institution in early 2002 found that the number one employment concern among unemployed respondents was flexibility in working hours to accommodate care responsibilities.

Of course, there are flaws in flexible working arrangements that can hinder participation. Workers do not have access to benefits provided to civil servants, which has led to political disputes at the state and federal levels. But these tensions arise because our system prioritizes the immobility of benefits – such as employer-tied health care – in a world where worker preferences, particularly among women, have shifted toward more emphasis on choice and portability will.

To better meet the needs of working mothers, we should offer flexible benefits for a flexible workforce. Maternity leave could be tied to an individual worker – like an IRA or HSA account – rather than to a specific employer. Calls for an extension of maternity leave for female employees forget that many working mothers drop out of the job precisely because the regulation is inflexible and tends to be less accommodating to women with childcare responsibilities.

As a show of appreciation for working mothers this Mother’s Day, we should welcome structural changes in labor markets that expand their employment opportunities, encourage growth in the independent sector and reshape benefits to be more portable for workers.

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Liya Palagashvili is a senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University and co-author of the study, Women as Independent Workers in the Gig Economy.

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Online pharmacy that said it would create 200-300 jobs lays off 62 workers in Davenport | Business & Economy https://taskba.com/online-pharmacy-that-said-it-would-create-200-300-jobs-lays-off-62-workers-in-davenport-business-economy/ Sat, 07 May 2022 00:48:45 +0000 https://taskba.com/online-pharmacy-that-said-it-would-create-200-300-jobs-lays-off-62-workers-in-davenport-business-economy/ Just over a year after announcing plans to expand into downtown Davenport, an online pharmacy has shed more than a quarter of its Quad-Cities workforce. Pharmaceutical packaging and dispensing service divvyDOSE has laid off 62 employees at its Davenport location. Celeste Pons, pharmacist at divvyDOSE, fills out a vitamin prescription by hand. FILEPHOTO An Optum […]]]>

Just over a year after announcing plans to expand into downtown Davenport, an online pharmacy has shed more than a quarter of its Quad-Cities workforce.

Pharmaceutical packaging and dispensing service divvyDOSE has laid off 62 employees at its Davenport location.






Celeste Pons, pharmacist at divvyDOSE, fills out a vitamin prescription by hand.


FILEPHOTO


An Optum Rx representative confirmed earlier this week that 41 full-time and 21 part-time employees were laid off from divvyDOSE, which occupied two floors of Mississippi Plaza in downtown Davenport.

The layoffs come approximately 15 months after divvyDOSE announced it would expand it to the Davenport offices. At the time, divvyDOSE employed around 230 people in the Quad-Cities and the company planned to create “200 to 300” more jobs in the region.

A spokesman for Optum Rx said that divvyDOSE would have a “smaller footprint” at the Davenport site, while packaging and dispensing services would remain at the company’s facility on John Deere Road in Moline.







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A “For Rent” sign on the Mississippi Plaza building at the corner of 2nd Street and Harrison Street in downtown Davenport. DivvyDOSE, an online pharmaceutical company, announced that it has laid off 62 employees from its Davenport facility. A spokesman said divvyDOSE will maintain a “smaller footprint” at its offices at Mississippi Plaza in Davenport.


Optum Rx, which is owned by Optum, explained the move in a statement on Friday.

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“With a focus on enhancing the pharmacy experience for consumers taking multiple medications, we are more closely aligning divvyDOSE’s personalized multi-dose packaging solutions with Optum Rx’s pharmacy services,” the statement said. “As we continue to evolve our differentiated pharmacy supply model to meet the core needs of customers, members and consumers, our integrated approach and distinctive platform will allow us to offer pharmacy supply that is simple, effective and affordable for all.”







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Celeste Pons, Pharmacy Technician at Divvy Dose, fills out a vitamin prescription by hand. The new pharmacy organizes patients’ tablets into pre-sorted packs and delivers them to patients’ doorsteps at no additional cost.


FILEPHOTO


Optum Rx said it is helping the laid-off workers with job placement and will transfer some employees to other parts of the company.

Optum, Optum Rx and divvyDOSE are all owned by the UnitedHealth Group corporate umbrella. UnitedHealth, the country’s largest health insurer, acquired divvyDOSE in the fall of 2020 for an alleged $300 million.

A competitor to Amazon’s PillPack, the company helps patients, particularly those with multiple chronic conditions, organize their medications in clear, easy-to-use packages that indicate what day and time to take them. The company organizes patients’ pills into pre-sorted packs and delivers them by post at no additional cost.







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dr Arvind Movva is the founder and CEO of DivvyDOSE. Rock Island’s new pharmacy organizes pills for patients in pre-sorted packs and delivers them by mail at no additional cost.


FILEPHOTO


The original divvyDOSE was launched in 2015 by doctor Arvind Movva. Based at a Rock Island pharmacy at the time, divvyDOSE supplied medication sorted in individual packets clearly labeled with the date and time the medication or medications were taken.

In a February 2021 press release, the Quad Cities Chamber said it had partnered with the City of Davenport and worked with the divvyDOSE site selector to secure office space in Davenport’s Mississippi Plaza.

Chamber and City of Davenport officials heralded news of divvyDOSE’s planned expansion in Davenport as a major success story that would contribute to a more vibrant downtown area.

Davenport City officials said the planned expansion is “a big step in the arm” in occupying vacant downtown office space in a building that has been vacated in recent years by major employers, including Lee Enterprises. The company, which owns the Quad-City Times, moved from its downtown offices in the Mississippi Plaza building to a location on East 53rd Street in 2019.

“We understand that every company must make decisions that are best for its business, and firing employees is never easy,” the Quad Cities Chamber said in a statement on Friday about divvyDOSE’s layoffs. “We appreciate the company’s continued presence in our region despite the reduction. The Quad Cities Chamber’s mission is to provide connections and resources for all businesses in the region. We cannot provide any additional information on this specific employer.”

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Amazon Union loses vote at Second Staten Island Warehouse https://taskba.com/amazon-union-loses-vote-at-second-staten-island-warehouse/ Mon, 02 May 2022 22:01:27 +0000 https://taskba.com/amazon-union-loses-vote-at-second-staten-island-warehouse/ Increasing union organizing efforts at Amazon took a hit Monday when workers at a Staten Island warehouse voted by a large majority not to join a union, just weeks after the union won a landmark victory at a larger facility nearby had achieved. According to the National Labor Relations Board, workers cast 380 votes for […]]]>

Increasing union organizing efforts at Amazon took a hit Monday when workers at a Staten Island warehouse voted by a large majority not to join a union, just weeks after the union won a landmark victory at a larger facility nearby had achieved.

According to the National Labor Relations Board, workers cast 380 votes for union representation and 618 against. Around 1,600 camp employees were entitled to vote.

For Amazon, the overwhelming victory could assuage executives’ fears that unionization may be gaining momentum across the workforce. The company, which has raised wages and spent millions of dollars on anti-union campaigns, relies on a steady stream of hourly workers.

The result was a setback for upstart Amazon Labor Union, which against the odds clinched a victory at the larger Amazon warehouse nearby last month. The loss also points to the potential limits of increasing worker interest in unionizing at Amazon and beyond.

In the six months to March, union election registrations rose nearly 60 percent from the same period a year earlier. This trend includes companies that often hire better-educated workers for nonprofessional jobs, like Starbucks and outdoor gear chain REI. However, labor experts and organizers say it may be more difficult to unionize workers who are less economically secure, as they may be more vulnerable to pressure from an employer and less willing to take the risk of engaging in a union campaign.

While the union campaign that was successful at the larger Amazon warehouse last month included a large proportion of full-time workers, a larger proportion of workers at the smaller facility work part-time. Many say they don’t have enough hours to pay their bills. But some workers said before the vote they were skeptical the union could meet targets it had set, such as a $30 hourly wage.

Amazon says its flexible, part-time work schedule appeals to many workers and that its average starting wage is over $18 an hour.

The employees whose votes were counted on Monday work at LDJ5. It’s part of a cluster of Staten Island warehouses that Amazon has opened in recent years to serve customers in New York City’s critical market, making it the largest private employer in the borough.

“We’re glad our team at LDJ5 was able to make their voices heard,” Kelly Nantel, a spokeswoman for Amazon, said in a statement. “We look forward to further direct cooperation to make every day better for our employees.”

Speaking to supporters outside the Brooklyn Labor Department office where the votes were being tallied, Derrick Palmer, co-founder of the union, said the union would keep pushing. “There’s no way we’re going to stop or let it get us down,” he said. “It will do the complete opposite. We will go ten times harder.”

A year ago, workers at Amazon’s largest facility, which Amazon calls JFK8, began trying to form an independent union with no deep ties to organized labor to represent the thousands of workers at the massive fulfillment center who pick items for individuals and ship them in Cartons pack orders. Workers voted to organize by a majority of almost 11 percentage points, although Amazon has contested the result.

That union, the Amazon Labor Union, began targeting a smaller, second building nearby, LDJ5, where workers receive packed boxes and sort them by customer’s location before sending them to an even smaller delivery depot or to a trucking company walk.

Workers in both buildings share some concerns about pay and high turnover at Amazon. A survey by the New York Times in June found a turnover of about 150 percent per year, even before the pandemic turned work upside down.

The union at JFK8 began as a frantic effort by two best friends, supported by GoFundMe appeals. But after its April victory at JFK8, the union became an international sensation, and its leaders sought to use its victory to gain momentum.

The chairmen, Christian Smalls and Mr. Palmer, met with the heads of the major unions, who pledged resources and support. Senator Bernie Sanders, the Vermont Independent, and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democrat from New York, gathered in front of LDJ5 on April 24, the day before voting began.

At JFK8, workers often work 10-hour shifts, if not longer, four days a week, but at LDJ5 many work part-time. The lack of full-time work has become a common grievance, especially since the Staten Island location often requires long commutes.

But part-time workers tend to be harder to organize because they interact less and invest less in their workplace overall. At Amazon, part-time workers do not receive healthcare, but they do have access to other benefits, such as

Micheal Aguilar, an employee at the facility who has been active in supporting the union, said several colleagues he met personally confided that they had voted no.

“Some of them are young – I don’t think they even know what a union is,” Mr Aguilar said, adding: “I think they thought Amazon was just a stepping stone, then they collect money from that place and then they leave.” into their own careers. They didn’t understand why they would want it if it’s just temporary for them.”

The union pushed for the vote even though many of its top officials and organizers work at JFK8 rather than the smaller facility, giving the group a weaker presence inside. Organizers attempted to counteract this in the weeks leading up to the vote by regularly speaking to workers outside of LDJ5 for a few hours after their shift, but acknowledged they did not have the same relationship with workers there.

Amazon has protested the JFK8 findings, questioning not only the union’s tactics but also the independence of the labor agency. On Friday, an agency official granted a hearing on all of Amazon’s 25 objections, saying they “could be grounds for the election to be overturned.”

When another union objected to its loss at an Amazon warehouse in Alabama last year, the union was granted a hearing on more than 20 of its objections for similar reasons. After this hearing, the employment agency determined that two of the union’s concerns were widespread enough to affect the outcome of the election and warranted discarding the results. The result of a vote at this facility is up in the air in anticipation of 400 contested ballots, with the union slightly behind according to an initial count.

Within LDJ5, Amazon stepped up and streamlined its anti-union campaign. Ofori Agboka, the vice president responsible for Amazon’s global human resources department, visited the building. He is not known to have visited JFK8 around the elections there.

Organizers said that for much of the campaign at JFK8, Amazon tried to portray the union as a “third party” that would step in between workers and management. But that message fell on empty because the organizers were current and former workers. At LDJ5, the company instead attempted to cast doubt on the Amazon labor union’s intentions and motives, sometimes by quoting lines from the union’s charter.

For example, the constitution states that workers can be removed from the group if they interfere in the conduct of union business or behave improperly at meetings. Union officials say the company misleadingly quoted such provisions to stoke workers’ concerns that the union might let them down. Amazon did not comment.

Gene Bruskin, a longtime union organizer who advised the Amazon Union in the two Staten Island elections, said a win would have generated “a huge tailwind,” but that the task facing the Amazon Union is, in a way, challenging remained the same Either way: successfully negotiated a contract with Amazon that improves pay and working conditions.

“It would be better with a second unit, but in a way it wouldn’t change,” added Mr. Bruskin. “What it takes to convince Amazon to negotiate a contract between 8,000 or 9,500 workers isn’t much different.”

Coral Murphy Marcos contributed reporting.

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Cranston, Della Piana receive Hats Off Award | news https://taskba.com/cranston-della-piana-receive-hats-off-award-news/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/cranston-della-piana-receive-hats-off-award-news/ TEWKSBURY – On Thursday, April 28, 2022, the Tewksbury Rotary Club honored TMHS Class of 2022 members Alek Cranston and Andrew Della Piana for receiving the April 2022 Hat’s Off Award. The Hat’s Off Award is a joint initiative of the Tewksbury Rotary Club and Tewksbury Memorial High School to recognize students who have distinguished […]]]>

TEWKSBURY – On Thursday, April 28, 2022, the Tewksbury Rotary Club honored TMHS Class of 2022 members Alek Cranston and Andrew Della Piana for receiving the April 2022 Hat’s Off Award.

The Hat’s Off Award is a joint initiative of the Tewksbury Rotary Club and Tewksbury Memorial High School to recognize students who have distinguished themselves both academically and civicly in the community.

Alek Cranston, son of Svetlana and James Cranston, was nominated by TMHS faculty members Melanie Ryan and Kennan Daniels for his academic achievements, leadership qualities and friendly, positive personality. His ability to be respected by both teachers and fellow students while being personable and connected to his fellow students is part of what makes him a humble but effective leader.

Academically, Cranston is more than just an outstanding student.

As Valedictorian of the Class of 2022, he ran a full curriculum comprising 10 AP (Advanced Placement) courses, achieving a perfect score on his Mathematics MCAS and the top grade of 5 on his English MCAS.

Cranston received the Rensselaer Medal for Math/Science Achievement, was nominated for and entered the Ashdown Chemistry Competition, and achieved an impressive score of 1530 on his SAT college admissions test.

Within his Tewksbury Memorial High School community, Cranston was an active member of the Math Team, the Russian School of Math, and the National Honor Society.

Outside the halls of TMHS, Cranston has put his leadership skills to good use on the fields of TMHS as captain of the Cross Country Team, Winter Indoor Track Team and Spring Track and Field Team. He has also received Coach’s Awards for Cross Country and Indoor Track.

As a first-generation American on his mother’s side, Cranston feels strong ties to both his Tewksbury community and his Ukrainian heritage, as he has many relatives who still live in Ukraine.

Locally, Cranston was active in the community as a member and Senior Patrol Leader of Boy Scout Troop 322, earning the highest Scouts rank of Eagle Scout.

Cranston has also volunteered at Strongwater Farms, and despite his busy academic and athletic schedule, he somehow manages to find the time for a part-time job as a host/serving assistant at the Red Heat Tavern.

Andrew Della Piana, son of Jean and Neil Della Piana, was recognized by TMHS Faculty Member Jim Sullivan for his dedication, professionalism and hard work in terms of his broadcasting skills within the TMHS community, as well as his involvement in the town of Tewksbury and the Merrimack Valley nominated community for conference sports broadcasts.

Hard work and dedication are evident in Della Piana’s academic career as he maintained a regular position on the Honors List and the Principals List. He is also an active member of the National Honor Society.

Athletically, Della Piana has achieved success in multiple sports at TMHS.

He is a three-year member of the TMHS baseball team, a four-year member of the TMHS golf team, and a four-year member of the TMHS hockey team. He is especially proud and grateful to be a contributing member of the 2022 TMHS Ice Hockey D2 State Championship team.

Della Piana has used his athletic skills as a volunteer assistant coach for the Tewksbury girls’ softball league, a fundraiser for the TMHS girls’ basketball team, and a member of the peer mentoring program to support core training. His volunteer work also extends to being a camp counselor for the Tewksbury Public Schools summer program and AlphaBest Summer Camp.

Despite all of this success on and off the field, Della Piana really shines when practicing his speaking skills.

Della Piana, recognized as The Voice of Tewksbury High Sports, is the public address announcer for TMHS varsity sports and broadcasts play-by-play for TMHS basketball, soccer, hockey and football. He also broadcasts Play by Play for UMass Lowell Athletics and is a sportswriter for Your Tewksbury Today.

As if this student athlete’s schedule wasn’t busy enough, Della Piana also works as a USA Hockey official and as an attendant at the Trull Brook Golf Course Pro Shop.

After graduating, Della Piana plans to study broadcasting and digital journalism at Syracuse University with hopes of a career as a play-by-play sports broadcaster on a large network.

Cranston is still deciding which college to attend, but plans to pursue a career in mechanical engineering.

As these two well-deserved Hat’s Off Award recipients prepare to retire from TMHS, it is evident that their hard work, determination and talent will bring them continued success in their future careers.

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Report: Lack of Childcare Costs $2.7B | news https://taskba.com/report-lack-of-childcare-costs-2-7b-news/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:53:00 +0000 https://taskba.com/report-lack-of-childcare-costs-2-7b-news/ BOSTON – The lack of childcare options in Massachusetts costs families, businesses and the state government more than $2.7 billion a year. That’s according to a new report from the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, which says working families lose an estimated $1.7 million a year in lost wages because they can’t show up for work because […]]]>

BOSTON – The lack of childcare options in Massachusetts costs families, businesses and the state government more than $2.7 billion a year.

That’s according to a new report from the Massachusetts Taxpayers Foundation, which says working families lose an estimated $1.7 million a year in lost wages because they can’t show up for work because they can’t find or afford childcare.

Meanwhile, employers lose an estimated $812 million annually in productivity and turnover due to a lack of child care, according to the report, while the state government loses $188 million annually in tax revenue.

The lack of options is compounded by changes in workforce dynamics and other factors that have resulted in fewer people wanting to work in the childcare industry.

“Massachusetts has both a childcare problem and a workforce problem, both of which must be addressed to support an economic recovery from a global pandemic,” said Eileen McAnneny, MTF President. “An affordable and accessible childcare system can help us meet the challenges of our workforce, fuel economic growth, and solidify Massachusetts’ reputation as a top state to live and work in.”

The report cited data from the US Chamber of Commerce showing that 63.4% of parents miss about 14 workdays a year due to childcare issues.

In Massachusetts, that translates to an estimated $457 million in lost income for about 112,000 hired workers with children under the age of 5.

About 8% of parents have had to switch from full-time to part-time jobs because of childcare issues, according to the report’s authors, which equates to more than 20,000 working parents in Massachusetts permanently reducing their hours, with an estimated $1.2 billion in lost wages .

About 35,000 parents with children under five have left the workforce during the pandemic, costing employers about $563 million annually in additional rehire and retraining costs, according to the report.

The report also highlights how child care in Massachusetts is becoming increasingly unaffordable for working families.

The average cost of infant care is just $21,000 a year in Massachusetts, the nation’s most expensive state, behind only Washington, DC, and well above the national average of $15,888. That’s more expensive than tuition and fees at some for four colleges, the report notes.

Childcare costs for young children are not much lower, according to the report, averaging $15,095 per year, according to the report.

Many daycare centers are financially strained after reopening after closing in 2020 to prevent the spread of coronavirus, and advocates say low compensation and rising childcare costs are putting some providers out of business.

Meanwhile, care providers are struggling to retain workers in an industry where pay has traditionally been low and the risk of catching COVID-19 is heightened, advocates say.

Children under the age of 5 are still not eligible to receive the COVID-19 vaccines, leaving them vulnerable to infection.

On Beacon Hill, Gov. Charlie Baker and lawmakers are pushing to expand federal funding to deal with a lack of options and a shrinking workforce.

House lawmakers on Wednesday approved a $49.7 billion budget that would see spending $70 million to increase salaries for providers of early childhood education and care that accept government subsidies. The plan also calls for updating a state law to allow childcare facilities to be paid based on student enrollment rather than day-to-day attendance.

Amy O’Leary, executive director of Strategies for Children, a Boston-based advocacy group, said it’s critical for the state to invest more in early education and child care.

“Decades of research have shown that quality early education benefits young children, families and our communities,” said O’Leary. “In the past two years, the connection to our economy has become even clearer.”

Christian M. Wade reports on the Massachusetts Statehouse for the North of Boston Media Group’s newspapers and websites. Email him at cwade@northofboston.com.

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